About Me

I am a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at York University.

Office: N503 Ross
Office Hours: Tuesday 2:30–4:30, 6:00–7:00, Thursday 1:00–2:00, or email me to arrange another time.
E-mail: matteo.n@husky.neu.edu

Teaching

2015–2016: MATH 1505: Mathematics for the Life and Social Sciences. Course materials are on Moodle.

Fall 2014: MATH 1215: Mathematical Thinking. Syllabus.

Spring 2014: MATH 1251: Calculus and Differential Equations for Biology. Syllabus.

Fall 2013: MATH 1215: Mathematical Thinking. Syllabus.

Spring 2013: MATH 1215: Mathematical Thinking. Syllabus.

Fall 2012: MATH 1231: Calculus for Business and Economics. Syllabus.

Fall 2011: MATH 1231: Calculus for Business and Economics. Syllabus.

Spring 2011: MATH 1251: Calculus and Differential Equations for Biology. Syllabus.

Fall 2010: MATH 1251: Calculus and Differential Equations for Biology.

My Teaching Statement.

Research

My research is in discrete geometry, using tools from combinatorics, group theory, and topology. My dissertation research is about convex polytopes and tilings by convex polytopes having few flag orbits. My other interests include graph theory and combinatorial number theory.

My Curriculum Vitae.

My Research Statement.

Papers

N. Matteo. “Combinatorially two-orbit convex polytopes.” Discrete & Computational Geometry 55 (3), April 2016, pp. 662–680. arXiv:1411.1782 [math.MG].

N. Matteo. “Two-orbit convex polytopes and tilings.” Discrete & Computational Geometry 55 (2), March 2016, pp. 296–313. arXiv:1403.2125 [math.MG].

P. Larson, N. Matteo, S. Shelah. “Majority decisions when abstention is possible.” Discrete Mathematics 312 (7), April 2012, pp. 1336–1352. arXiv:1003.2756 [math.CO].

N. Matteo, Y. Morton. “Ionosphere Geomagnetic Field: Comparison of IGRF Model Prediction and Satellite Measurements 1991–2010.” Radio Science 46 (4), August 2011, RS4003. DOI: 0.1029/2010RS004529.

N. Matteo, Y. Morton. “Higher-order ionospheric error at Arecibo, Millstone, and Jicamarca.” Radio Science 45 (6), December 2010, RS6006. DOI: 10.1029/2010RS004394.

N. Matteo, Y. Morton, P. Chandrasekaran, F. van Graas. “Higher Order Ionosphere Errors at Arecibo, Millstone, and Jicamarca.” Proceedings of ION GNSS 2009, Savannah, GA, September 2009, pp. 2739–2750. Available on Y. Morton's site.

Other things

See the video of my talk at the Fields Institute for the Retrospective Workshop on Discrete Geometry, Optimization, and Symmetry (November 2013).

A well-regarded answer on Math.StackExchange: What is the Coxeter diagram for?

A little-regarded answer on Math.StackExchange, of which I'm fond: Finite Vertex-Transitive Planar game of Civilization. Civilization is a game played on a tiled surface representing the Earth. Typically the tiled surface is a cylinder (the arctic and antarctic regions are impassable) or sometimes a torus (when the north end of the map wraps to the south, as well as east to west.) As far as I know, it hasn't been tried on the real projective plane or the Klein bottle. The questioner wanted to do a tiling on the sphere, like Earth's surface, while keeping vertex-transitivity for “strategic fairness.”
I explained that this is impossible, for the large vertex numbers required. Somehow, vertex-transitivity doesn't like even-dimensional spheres (unit spheres in odd-dimensional space). I think this is related to the Hairy ball theorem, and to the fact that the only group which acts freely on points on an even-dimensional sphere is Z/2Z.

Factor for TI-Basic.

Polytope links

Graph data